Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery

At Tajmeel Dental Center, we provide a full spectrum of surgical services and compassionate support for you.

At Tajmeel Dental Center, we provide a full spectrum of surgical services and compassionate support for you and your family. Our team of dental experts offers special focus on Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, giving out the highest calibre of surgical care for patients requiring bone grafts, implant placements and treatments for diseases and injuries to the teeth, jaws, mouth, bones and facial structures.

Tajmeel Dental Center has highly skilled oral & maxillofacial surgeons committed to providing the very best in oral and maxillofacial care. The team of surgeons at Tajmeel Dental Center provides a number of dental and jaw related services.

State of the art facilities at our Tajmeel Dental Center are equipped with operating theatres where we are able to provide in-house general anaesthetic and local anaesthetic procedures.

Dental Facts

Why do we have wisdom teeth?

Adults can have up to 32 teeth. The wisdom teeth are the last to come through, right at the back. They usually appear when you are between 17 and 25, although sometimes they appear many years later. Nowadays people often have jaws that are too small for all 32 teeth - 28 teeth are often the most we have room for. So if all the other teeth are present and healthy there may not be enough space for the wisdom teeth to come through properly.

Do they always cause problems?

No. If there is enough room they will usually come through into a useful position and cause no more problems than any other tooth. Often there will be some slight discomfort as they come through, but this is only temporary and will disappear once the tooth is fully in position.

What is an impacted wisdom tooth?

If there is not enough room, the wisdom tooth may try to come through, but will get stuck against the tooth in front of it. The wisdom tooth will be at an angle, and will be described by the dentist as 'impacted'.

What problems should I be prepared for?

If part of the wisdom tooth has appeared through the gum and part of it is still covered, the gum may become sore and perhaps swollen. Food particles and bacteria can collect under the gum edge, and it will be difficult to clean the area effectively. Your dentist will tell you whether this is a temporary problem that can be dealt with by using mouthwashes and special cleaning methods (and possibly antibiotics), or whether it is better to have the tooth removed.

What can I do to help myself?

If your gums are sore and swollen, use a mouthwash of medium hot water with a teaspoonful of salt. (Check that it is not too hot before using it.) Swish the salt water around the tooth, trying to get into the areas your toothbrush cannot reach. An antibacterial mouthwash such as Corsodyl can also reduce the inflammation. Pain-relieving tablets can also be useful for short term.

But, what if it does not help?

If the pain does not go away or if you find it difficult to open your mouth, you should see a dentist.

Are x-rays needed?

The dentist will usually take x-rays to see the position of the root, and to see whether there is room for the tooth to come through into a useful position.

What are the main reasons for taking wisdom teeth out?

When it is clear that the wisdom teeth will not be able to come through into a useful position because there is not enough room, and they are also causing some pain or discomfort. If they have only partly come through and are decayed - as it will be difficult to clean them as thoroughly as other teeth. If the wisdom tooth is causing a cleaning problem and has no real use. If the wisdom tooth starts to 'over-grow' - happens if the lower one has already been removed or is impacted and cannot come through, and the upper one has no tooth to bite against. Thus, the upper one will come down too far, looking for a tooth to make contact with. If they are painful.

Are wisdom teeth difficult to take out?

It all depends on the position and the shape of the roots. Your dentist will tell you how easy or difficult each tooth will be to remove after looking at the x-rays.

Will it makes any difference to my face or mouth?

Taking wisdom teeth out may cause some swelling for a few days. But as soon as the area is healed, there will be no difference to your f ace or appearance. Your mouth will feel more comfortable and less crowded, especially if the teeth were impacted.

I've had my tooth out - what should I do now?

Take it easy for the rest of the day. Take as little exercise as you can, and rest as much as you can. Keep your head up to avoid any bleeding.

What precautions should I take?

Avoid hot food or drinks until the anesthetic wears off. This is important as you cannot feel pain properly and may burn or scald your mouth. Also be careful not to chew your cheek, which can happen when there is no feeling. While resting try to keep your head higher for the first night using an extra pillow if possible.

Should I rinse my mouth out?

Do not be tempted to rinse the area for the first 24 hours. It is important to allow the socket to heal, and you must be careful not to damage the blood clot by eating on that side or letting your tongue disturb it. This can allow infection into the socket and affect healing.

Is there anything else I should avoid?

Avoid alcohol for at least 24 hours, as this can encourage bleeding and delay healing. Eat and drink lukewarm food as normal but avoid chewing on that area of your mouth.

When should I brush?

It is just as important, if not more so, to keep your mouth clean after an extraction. However, you do need to be careful around the extraction site.

What do I do if it bleeds?

The first thing to remember is that there may be some slight bleeding for the first day or so. Many people are concerned about the amount of bleeding. This is due to the fact that a small amount of blood is mixed with a larger amount of saliva, which looks more dramatic than it is. If you do notice bleeding, do not rinse out, but apply pressure to the socket. Bite firmly on a folded piece of clean cotton material such as a handkerchief for at least 15 minutes. Make sure this is placed directly over the extraction site and that the pad is replaced if necessary. If the bleeding has not stopped after an hour or two, contact your dentist.

Are implants safe? How long will they last?

Implants are a well-established, tried-and-tested treatment. The vast majority of modern implants last for at least 15 years.

I have some of my own teeth. Can I still have implants?

Yes. You can have any number of teeth replaced with implants - from one single tooth to a complete set.

Can implants always be used to replace missing teeth?

It depends on the state of the bone in your jaw. Your dentist will arrange for a number of special tests to assess the amount of bone still there. If there is not enough, or if it isn't healthy enough, it may not be possible to place implants without grafting bone into the area first.

Do implants hurt?

Placing the implants requires a small operation. This can be carried out under local anesthesia with sedation or with a general anesthesia. You will not feel any pain at the time, but you may feel some discomfort during the week following the surgery. This is usually due to having stitches in place, and the normal healing process.

Can I have the new teeth straight away?

No. The implants need to bond (integrate) with the bone after they have been placed. This takes about 3 months in the lower jaw and 6 months in the upper jaw. If you are having one, two or three teeth replaced, you will have a temporary restoration in the meantime. If you have complete dentures, then you can wear them throughout the healing period once they have been adjusted after the surgery.

How long does treatment take?

It takes about 12 months from the initial assessment to the time when the artificial teeth or dentures are finally attached to the implants. However, if only the lower jaw is involved then it may only take around 5 months. A lot depends on how complicated your treatment is. Your dentist will be able to give you a timetable once the surgery has been done.

Is it difficult to clean adjacent teeth?

Cleaning around the teeth attached to the implants is no more difficult than cleaning natural teeth. However, there may be areas that give you problems and you'll be shown methods to help.

If I had gum disease when I had my own teeth, will I get it with the teeth attached to the implants?

Only if you don't care for them well enough. If you keep them clean, and don't smoke, then you should not have any problems.

Can I take the teeth out if they are fixed to implants?

Most artificial teeth attached to implants can only be placed and removed by the dentist. However, if you have complete dentures fixed to the implants by bars, then you'll be able to take them out for cleaning.

Do the implants show?

Your dentist will make sure that the implants won't show during all normal movements of the mouth and lips. You will need to be able to see them, so that you can clean them properly.

Do I have an implant for each missing tooth?

No, unless you're only having a single tooth replaced. Normally, five or six implants are used to replace all the teeth in one jaw, as each implant can usually support two teeth. For a few missing teeth, two or three implants may be used.

What if I get hit in the face?

Implants and the teeth they support can be damaged by an accident in the same way that natural teeth can. However, if the false teeth are damaged and the remnants are left in the bone then they may be more difficult to remove than natural teeth would be. After healing, new false teeth can then be placed alongside the fragments.

What happens if the implant does not bond (integrate) with the bone?

This happens very rarely. If the implant becomes loose during the healing period or just after, then it is easily removed and healing takes place in the normal way. Once the jaw has healed, another implant can be placed there.

Is the treatment expensive?

Unfortunately, yes, due to the expensive materials used in the procedure. However, in many situations, the cost of the treatment is only a little more than the cost of more conventional treatment with crowns and bridges.

How soon can I have a cigarette?

It is important not to do anything which will increase your blood pressure, as this can lead to further bleeding. We recommend that you avoid smoking for as long as you can after an extraction, but this should be at least for the rest of the day.

Is there anything I can do to help my mouth?

Different people heal at different speeds after an extraction. It is important to keep your mouth and the extraction site as clean as possible, making sure that the socket is kept clear of all food and debris. Don't rinse for the first 24 hours, and this will help your mouth to start healing. After this time use a salt-water mouthwash, this helps to heal the socket. A teaspoon of salt in a glass of warm water gently rinsed around the socket twice a day can help to clean and heal the area. Keep this up for at least a week or for as long as your dentist tells you. It is important to keep to a healthy diet; and take a Vitamin C supplement, which will help your wound to heal.

I am in pain, what should I take?

There will usually be some tenderness in the area for the first few days, and in most cases some simple pain relief is enough to ease the discomfort. What you would normally take for a headache should be enough. However, always follow the manufacturer's instructions and if in doubt check with your doctor first. Do not take aspirin, as this will make your wound bleed.

Are there any medicines I should avoid?

Aspirin should be avoided because it can thin the blood slightly. Asthma sufferers should avoid Ibuprofen-based pain relief.

I am still in pain, what could it be?

Sometimes an infection can get in the socket, which can be very painful. This is when the bony socket walls are exposed and become infected. This is called a dry socket, and in some cases, it is worse than the original toothache. In this case, it is important to see your dentist, who may place a dressing in the socket and prescribe a course of antibiotics to help relieve the infection. You may also feel the sharp edge of the socket with your tongue and sometimes small pieces of bone may work their way to the surface of the socket. This is perfectly normal.

Will my dentist need to see me again?

If it has been a particularly difficult extraction, the dentist will give you a follow-up appointment. This could be to remove any stitches that were needed, or simply to check the area is healing well. Your dentist will also want to discuss the options available for you to replace your lost tooth.

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